Documentation

Before purchasing any goods it’s important to secure documentation that can help to verify any claims made by the seller. While documents may vary from purchase to purchase, some of the items that are smart to secure include:

Vehicles:

The title

The most basic document for any used car sale is the vehicle's title. The title should be free of any liens - claims by a bank or other lender - and the buyer should be able to see whether the title carries a salvage status. This would be present on the title if the vehicle has been previously refurbished. The title paperwork also needs to be legible and in good condition. Some states will not accept a paper title that has excessive wear or has a great deal of damage. You should NEVER buy a vehicle that doesn’t have a title. Vehicles without titles cannot be registered with your state’s DMV and are ineligible for resale.

The Bill of Sale

A Bill of Sale is another important document. This document identifies all parties involved in the transaction as well as information about warrantees or if the vehicle is being sold ‘as is.’ It also identifies the vehicle according to VIN number. Most DMVs will want to see a bill of sale to verify basic additional information, including sale price. The sale price on the bill of sale is also used to calculate the auto sales tax that most states require any time a vehicle is sold. Fill out your own PaySAFE Bill of Sale for free here: https://paysafeescrow.com/billofsale/wizard

More paperwork

Other paperwork may be required, but what those documents are vary from state to state. Make sure to visit your local DMV either in person or online to see what specific documents are required for registering a vehicle and getting it legally on the road.

Bill of Lading

A bill of lading is simply acknowledgment from the shipper that they have taken possession of the seller’s vehicle. In many cases, this is also the documentation that buyers will want to see before they give permission for escrow funds to be released. On PaySAFE’s platform, we recommend uploading a copy or scan of any bill of lading so that all parties are kept in the loop.

Livestock:

Purchase Agreement or Bill of Sale

Whether buyer and seller are best friends or completely unknown to each other, there should always be a purchase agreement or Bill of Sale drawn up for private treaty livestock sales. In addition to basic information like the breed, head count and sale price, your purchase agreements should include any other claims or warranties that may be included. It should also detail when the seller should expect payment - especially if there are partial payments involved in your transaction. Fill out your own PaySAFE Bill of Sale for free here: https://paysafeescrow.com/billofsale/wizard

Bill of Lading

A bill of lading is simply acknowledgment from the shipper that they have taken possession of the seller’s stock. In many cases, this is also the documentation that buyers will want to see before they give permission for funds to be released. On PaySAFE’s platform, we recommend uploading a copy or scan of any bill of lading so that all parties are kept in the loop.

Commercial Goods:

Title

Buying used commercial vehicles is a very similar process to purchasing personal vehicles. The primary document you should always ask for is the vehicles title. Inspecting the title to be sure the equipment is free of any leins or if it has been marked as salvage is priority one. Beyond that, ensure that the title is in good, legible condition as some DMVs will not accept badly damaged titles.

The Bill of Sale

A Bill of Sale is another important document. This document identifies all parties involved in the transaction as well as information about warrantees or if the vehicle is being sold ‘as is.’ It also identifies the vehicle according to VIN number. Most DMVs will want to see a bill of sale to verify basic additional information, including sale price. The sale price on the bill of sale is also used to calculate the auto sales tax that most states require any time a vehicle is sold. Fill out your own PaySAFE Bill of Sale for free here: https://paysafeescrow.com/billofsale/wizard

Inspections Documents

Outside of a clean title, any inspection documentation that is available should also be included. In the case of used commercial equipment like restaurant appliances or manufacturing components, be sure to ask about the number of years of regular use the equipment experienced.

Purchase Agreement

Whether buyer and seller are best friends or completely unknown to each other, there should always be a purchase agreement drawn up for the sale of used commercial goods. In addition to basic information like sale price and names of all the parties involved, your purchase agreements should include any other claims or warranties that may be included. It should also detail when the seller should expect payment - especially if there are partial payments involved in your transaction.

Bill of Lading

A bill of lading is simply acknowledgment from the shipper that they have taken possession of the seller’s stock. In many cases, this is also the documentation that buyers will want to see before they give permission for funds to be released. On PaySAFE’s platform, we recommend uploading a copy or scan of any bill of lading so that all parties are kept in the loop.

Artwork & Collectables

Purchase Agreement or Bill of Sale

Whether buyer and seller are best friends or completely unknown to each other, there should always be a purchase agreement or bill of sale drawn up for the sale of artwork and collectables. In addition to basic information like sale price and names of all the parties involved, your purchase agreements should include any other claims, warranties, display equipment or certificates of authenticity that may be included. It should also detail when the seller should expect payment - especially if there are partial payments involved in your transaction for commissioned pieces. Fill out your own PaySAFE Bill of Sale for free here: https://paysafeescrow.com/billofsale/wizard

Certificates of Authenticity

When purchasing collectables or artwork it is not uncommon for buyers to seek out a certificate of authenticity. These documents often add a layer of comfort for buyers as the documents contain a great deal of information that can reinforce claims as to the items value. For both artwork and collectables, this can include information like whether the piece is original or a reproduction, the medium in which it was created, or if the items is part of a series or one-of-a-kind.

Bill of Lading

A bill of lading is simply acknowledgment from the shipper that they have taken possession of the seller’s stock. In many cases, this is also the documentation that buyers will want to see before they give permission for funds to be released. On PaySAFE’s platform, we recommend uploading a copy or scan of any bill of lading so that all parties are kept in the loop.

Domain Names

Purchase Agreement or Bill of Sale

Whether buyer and seller are best friends or completely unknown to each other, there should always be a purchase agreement or bill of sale drawn up for the sale of any domain names. In addition to basic information like sale price and names of all the parties involved, your purchase agreements should include any other claims or warranties that may be included. It should also detail when the seller should expect payment - especially if there are partial payments involved in your transaction. Fill out your own PaySAFE Bill of Sale for free here: https://paysafeescrow.com/billofsale/wizard

EPP Code

In addition to a purchase agreement, you must ensure that you receive the EPP code from the seller when purchasing any domain name. This code is unique to each URL. The code is officially called an AuthInfo Code and an Auth-Info code by ICANN and registry operators. It is alternatively called an auth code, a transfer key, a transfer secret, an EPP code, EPP authentication code, or EPP authorization code.

Additional Paperwork

Some domain registrars require additional items such as notarized purchase agreements or bills of sale. Be sure to check with your chosen domain registrar for any additional documentation they may require.